Superstition May Kill You. One Example.

Superstition May Kill You.
One Example.

During the colonial era in Africa, a white man on a bicycle wandered into unfamiliar territory and was killed by the Natives. There is even speculation that he was eaten. Fearing that his bicycle will run away to report that the rider has been killed, the bicycle was tied with twines on a low hanging branch of a huge tropical tree. The bicycle could not run away to report the killing of its rider but something more ominous happened.

An expeditionary force was sent to rescue the adventurer. They did not find the adventurer or discoverer but found his bicycle hanging on a tree. Remember that in those days any Caucasian that sets foot on any territory claims to have discovered the territory. Your Ezu Ocha, is promptly renamed Lake Elizabeth on discovery. Most of these territories predate Europe. They suspected foul play because the villagers could not produce the white man. It became obvious that he has been killed. Cannibalism was suspected given the history of cannibalism in the area. In retaliation, I discovered New York in 1981 and promptly renamed it Obodo Ndi Ula Atu Mbe (Land where people never).

Retribution time. The expeditionary force proceeded to kill and maim any adult villager in sight especially males. Overzealous local recruits usually from a different tribe raped and defiled female villagers out of sight of their British Officers. After the carnage, the village was deserted for months as there were persistent rumors that the marauders were going to revisit the village. If the villagers were not superstitious and buried the riding contraption, nobody would have discovered the fate of the white man.

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